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Berrimilla applies round-world theory of patience

Berrimilla applies round-world theory of patience
Alex Whitworth (front) and Peter Crozier will speak about their circumnavigation on 14 March at the CYCA

Berrimilla applies round-world theory of patience

Alex Whitworth and Peter Crozier are used to being patient. A year’s sailing journey around the world has taught them to deal with prevailing conditions as you experience them.

Alex Whitworth and Peter Crozier are used to being patient.  A year’s sailing journey around the world has taught them to deal with prevailing conditions as you experience them.

The crew of Berrimilla, sitting at the back of the fleet and frustrated by the light conditions that have only just started to improve, have a philosophy that you “take one day at a time and cop what you cop”.

“It was frustrating earlier on but we’re on the way again,” said skipper Alex Whitworth, reporting that Berrimilla was now travelling at approximately 8.5 knots with East-Sou’easterly wind.

Peter Crozier removed a lobster pot from the boat overnight, jumping into the cold water to cut it away.

“It stopped us dead – we were dragging it along like an anchor,” said Alex Whitworth.

The little boat which sailed to the UK at the end of the race last year and only arrived back in Sydney six days before this year’s race start is now dodging other forms of ocean ‘speed humps’.

While talking to the Rolex Sydney Hobart Media Centre this afternoon, Whitworth reported passing a sun fish “the size of a small car” just 8ft from the boat.

For the crew of this boat, it’s just another race to Hobart.

“Each one is like a little gem of its own – they have their own facets,” said a typically philosophical Whitworth.